Applescripting Keywords in Capture One

Applescripting Keywords in Capture One

In a previous article I wrote about using keywords to track and organise exported images. One of the things missing at the time was the ability to automatically apply the organising keywords to the variant being exported; the keywords had to be applied by hand. Doing things by hand in an automated process is generally to be avoided and it bugged me.  Capture One 10 dropped a short while back. There was no AppleScripting of keywords but they had exposed metadata which, with a little thought and effort, can be hauled in as a passable substitute by using a metadata field to store comma separated keywords. Metadata can be used in search filters and smart collections just like keywords; all we need is some code to add and remove our keywords from the metadata string and we have something useful.  Note that what we’re doing here is writing our own, custom keyword system. We’re not working with actual Capture One keywords, which would be prefereable but we still have a lot of usefulness. We can use it for smart collections and searches amongst other things, of which I’ll talk about below. Choice of Metadata field. You’re going to need, obviously, to pick a field that’s not being used. I picked the IPTC scene field, partly because I don’t use it but also because it’s recognised by Capture One as a comma separated list which makes it easier to see and edit in the metadata pane, if you need to.It’s found under “IPTC Image” in the Metadata panel. There are other fields to choose from if this doesn’t suit. You can find a...

A Menubar App for Bear, the Awesome Mac Note Taking App

Noodling around with Bear, the new kid on the Mac note taking block, it occurred to me that it would be very nice if there was something that would let me paste text into a note without having to switch to Bear, type, then switch back to whatever I was working on. There’s a couple of hotkeys to bring Bear to the front or create a new note but it’s a bit round the houses and it could be quicker. I had an hour or so to spare so I thought I’d have a crack at knocking something up. The result is BearBar, a Menubar app with a global hotkey that opens a popover window and appends the text you type to a Bear. I make no excuses for the fact that it’s very bare-bones indeed. The hotkey is hardcoded and unchangeable, there are no preferences and it has none of the visual elegance of Bear but it works. You can download it here. When you run it you’ll see an orange icon in the Menubar. You can bring its text entry popover up either by clicking on the icon or using the <cmd>Escape hotkey. Type some stuff, hit <cmd>S and it will append its text to a note called BearBar. The note is created if it doesn’t exist. If you change your mind and don’t want to append anything just click outside the popover or type <cmd>Escape again. To quit BearBar just hit the ‘Quit’ button at the bottom of the input box. All being well I’ll add extra functionality in due course and I’m open to any...

Capture One and the Recipe Open With

In a previous article I wrote about how to use keywords and smart albums to keep track of exports to specific locations in a more or less Lightroom Publishing Service kind of way. In this article I’m going to talk a bit about how we can draw on Capture One’s ability to run apps after image has been exported to post process the exported images. The legendary Jeffrey Friedl, who has written more plugins for Lightroom than actually exist, wrote a nice little Lightroom plugin that runs a script on images after they’ve been exported. Lightroom users have been using it for some time to do stuff like sending images out by email, zipping, adding keywords, borders, etc and it got me to thinking on whether something similar could be done in Capture One. Jeffrey’s plugin allows for scripts – shell, Python and whatnot. Capture One already has an Open With option on export recipes but only allowing the use of apps. However, AppleScript – sorry folks, no Windows here today – can create droplets. Droplets are AppleScript applets that process items that are dropped onto them. Droplets are essentially apps and so are recognised by Capture One in the Open With field.    The only difference between an AppleScript script and a droplet is that a droplet is a script with an open handler that has been saved from the Script Editor as an app. Here’s a pointless example: on open the_items repeat with the_item in the_items -- Do Groovy Stuff to the_item here display alert ("Image Path is: " & the_item) end repeat end open Paste the...
Organising and Tracking Exports in Capture One

Organising and Tracking Exports in Capture One

Organising & Tracking Exports in Capture One Lightroom has, in Publish Services, a simple but very powerful tool for exporting and maintaining selections of images on remote sites. A Publish Service maintains a collection of images to be published, dividing the collection into images waiting to be published, images already published and images waiting to be removed. An image is waiting to be published if it hasn’t yet been uploaded to the site or if it’s been changed in Lightroom. An image is marked as published if the version on the server is up to date. Images are marked to be deleted by simply removing them from the Service collection. Hitting the Publish button uploads any new or modified images to the server and removes any that have been marked for delete, keeping the images on the remote server synced with the Service collection. Publish Services, although powerful, don’t work for everything. They require that a remote server is capable of handling the data being sent to it by the Service, which many don’t, and for certain types of site – for example sites like Instagram or Twitter that don’t allow existing images to be replaced – the method simply isn’t suitable. I like things organised and structured and it bothered me for a long time that I couldn’t easily keep track of what I’d posted to social network sites so I sat down one day and cobbled together something to make life easier. It was simple, robust and it worked very well. Recently I switched from Lightroom to Capture One and during the process of rebuilding tools to...
Managing Lightroom Exports Like a Boss

Managing Lightroom Exports Like a Boss

Lightroom’s Publishing Services are great for posting to sites like Flickr or portfolio sites where you can re-upload changed images after the initial post but other sites like Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest where posts are subsequently unchangeable make less sense for a Publishing Service There’s also the very transient nature of many social media sites where images quickly drop below the horizon, where there’s no longer any real need to keep them updated and a Publishing Service becomes un-necessary. So sometimes exporting is the only alternative but one of the very nice things exporting doesn’t have that a publishing service does is upload tracking, where the service collection maintains separate sections for images that have been uploaded and those that are waiting. It would be nice if we could do something similar on exported shots. I do this fairly obvious thing where I export a shot, upload it to, say, Twitter then go back and tag it “Twitter”. That way I can filter out all the images that I’ve posted and easily pick a couple that haven’t. It works well enough but doing it all by hand but it could take some streamlining. So I gave it some thought, came up with something that works and figured why not share it. Caveat Apple Mac only.Kind of. Sorry but I don’t have easy access to a Windows machine. There’s no reason, on the face of it, why the methods described here shouldn’t work in Windows but the details may need tweaking. The plugin LUA source is open, if you feel like having a crack, knock yourself out and please do...
Lightroom: Keywords on Export

Lightroom: Keywords on Export

A very simple plugin knocked up on the spur of the moment when I needed exported images to get a tag telling me they’d been exported. The plugin works on Lightroom for Mac. It should work on Lightroom for Windows but as yet is untested. See Caveats below for more information. It’s essentially the standard Lightroom file export but with a couple of things added: One extra input field for keyword(s) (comma separated) that will be added to images as they’re exported. A second extra input field for a post export script. Installation Download the plugin here and unzip it Either: place it in the default Lightroom plugin folder and restart Lightroom Or: Place it somewhere sensible on your hard drive and use the Lightroom Plugin Manager to install it Use Once installed access the plugin from the Lightroom export dialog using the “Export to” dropdown at the top   fig 1. the export dialog.   Keywords Enter one or more keywords in the keyword input box. If you add multiple keywords separate them with commas. Whatever keywords are there will be added to images as they’re exported. The keyword will be created if it doesn’t already exist. In the screen grab above (fig 1.) I’m using ‘Twitter’ as a keyword. Post Export Script The Post Export field should be either empty or should contain the full path to a shell script; bash if you’re using a Mac, .cli or .bat if you’re using Windows. Note that this plugin hasn’t yet been tested on Windows (See Caveats below) Arguments The plugin sends the post export shell script two arguments; the full...

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